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Flea Treatment

Flea Biology

Adult fleas are parasites of warm-blooded animals such as cats, dogs, and humans.  Fleas go through complete metamorphosis, meaning they have an egg, a larva, a pupa, and an adult stage.  Under most situations, fleas will complete their life cycle within three to five weeks.

 

The female flea will lay 4 to 6 eggs after each blood meal and can usually lay several hundred during her lifetime.  The light colored eggs are deposited while on the host, but they fall off the animal and are frequently found in the host’s bedding, carpets, sofas, and crevices in the floor.  The eggs normally hatch between 1 and 10 days, depending on temperature and humidity, while most hatch within 36 hours.

 

Flea larvae are slender, white, legless and between 1/10 and 1/5 inch long.  They are free living and feed on debris found in their environment.  The larval stage usually lasts between 5 and … Read Full Post »

Spring Tree Tips

As you get ready to tackle spring cleaning jobs, don’t forget your trees. Keeping trees and landscaping green takes constant commitment; and, as they say, timing is everything.

As we turn away from the harsh winter months and head toward the growing season, here are some tips from expert tree care professional Mark Chisholm to help keep your trees and plants healthy. Chisholm is a third-generation arborist with the Aspen Tree Expert Company in New Jersey and a two-time winner of the International Society of Arboriculture’s (ISA) International Tree Climbing Championship.

PREPARE TO PRUNE
The best time to prune trees and shrubs varies depending upon species and desired results. Pruning during the dormant season, when the trees have no leaves, is usually best. This is the time to prune young trees for future structure, remove live limbs that are too low or close to the house, and remove limbs that might have been … Read Full Post »

9 Energy Saving Tips for Spring

Spring can be a transition season: a good time to clear out the effects of winter and look at what needs to be made ready for summer.

Here are nine things you can do in the spring to make you home more energy efficient:

Spring-cleaning

Spring-cleaning involves making sure all the fans in your home are working properly and are dust-free. Regularly wash or replace filters.
Change the airflow on your ceiling fan

Make sure you change the direction of airflow on your ceiling fan. In the winter, let the fan push warm air toward the floor and in summer, switch the direction and draw air upward, cooling the room and ensuring constant airflow.

Insulated, thermal-backed drapes

In preparing for the summer, consider investing in some insulated, thermal-backed drapes for your windows.
Air conditioning system

Before buying an air conditioning unit or system, find out its energy efficiency ratio (EER). Calculate the EER by dividing the unit’s cooling capacity (BTU’s/hour) by its … Read Full Post »

Keeping Rodents Out During Winter Months

Winter weather has pest rodents on the move. Rats and mice may seek food and shelter indoors in your home or place of business, causing damage and spreading disease. Here are some Rodent Action Tips to prevent rodents from setting up a permanent residence and to reduce the risk of disease:

1) SEAL UP

Seal up any openings or cracks large enough to squeeze a pencil through to keep rodents out. Steel wool and caulk are good for blocking small holes. Sheet or lath metal, hardware cloth or concrete can cover larger holes.

2) TRAP OUT

If rodents have already moved in, use ‘green’ methods such as snap traps or glue boards when appropriate. Traps can be baited with peanut butter and placed in areas where rodent droppings are found.

3) CLEAN UP

Minimize places for rodents to live by removing trash and debris from inside and outside the home. Eliminate potential rodent food sources by … Read Full Post »

Rodent Prevention Tip: Clean Up Food!

Clean up rodent food sources and nesting sites

Keep food in thick plastic or metal containers with tight lids.

Eliminate possible rodent food sources:

  • Keep food in thick plastic or metal containers with tight lids.
  • Clean up spilled food right away and wash dishes and cooking utensils soon after use.
  • Keep outside cooking areas and grills clean.
  • Always put pet food away after use and do not leave pet-food or water bowls out overnight.
  • Keep bird feeders away from the house and utilize squirrel guards to limit access to the feeder by squirrels and other rodents.
  • Use a thick plastic or metal garbage can with a tight lid.
  • Keep compost bins as far away from the house as possible (100 feet or more is best).
  • Keep grains and animal feed in thick plastic or metal containers with tight lids. In the evening, uneaten animal feed should be returned to containers with lids.

If storing trash and food waste inside the home, … Read Full Post »

The Basics of Wasp & Bee Control

Wasps and bees are beneficial insects, although they are generally considered to be pests because of their ability to sting. Wasps, in particular, can become a problem in autumn when they may disrupt many outdoor activities. People often mistakenly call all stinging insects “bees”. While both social wasps and bees live in colonies ruled by queens and maintained by workers, they look and behave differently. It is important to distinguish between these insects because different methods may be necessary to control them if they become a nuisance.

APPEARANCE

Wasps have a slender body with a narrow waist, slender, cylindrical legs, and appear smoothed-skinned and shiny. Yellowjackets, baldfaced hornets, and paper wasps are the most common types of wasps encountered by people.

Bees are robust-bodied and very hairy compared with wasps. Their hind legs are flattened for collecting and transporting pollen. Bees are important pollinators. Honey bees are responsible for more than 80% … Read Full Post »

Rodent Prevention Tip: Seal Up Holes!

Mice can squeeze through a hole the size of a nickel, and rats can squeeze through a hole the size of a half dollar! Prevent rodents from entering the home by checking inside and outside the house for gaps or holes.

Where to look for gaps or holes inside your home:

  • Inside, under, and behind kitchen cabinets, refrigerators and stoves.
  • Inside closets near the floor corners.
  • Around the fireplace.
  • Around doors.
  • Around the pipes under sinks and washing machines.
  • Around the pipes going to hot water heaters and furnaces.
  • Around floor vents and dryer vents.
  • Inside the attic.
  • In the basement or crawl space.
  • In the basement and laundry room floor drains.
  • Between the floor and wall juncture.

Where to look for gaps or holes outside your home:

  • In the roof among the rafters, gables, and eaves.
  • Around windows.
  • Around doors.
  • Around the foundation
  • Attic vents and crawl space vents.
  • Under doors.
  • Around holes for electrical, plumbing, cable, and gas lines.

Fill small holes with steel wool. Put caulk around the steel wool to keep … Read Full Post »

EPA Duct Sealing Tips

WORKING WITH A CONTRACTOR

Many homeowners choose to hire a professional contractor for duct improvement projects. Most heating and cooling equipment contractors also repair ductwork.

Look for a contractor that will:

  • Inspect the whole duct system, including the attic, crawlspace, garage and basement as needed.
  • Evaluate the system’s supply and return air balance. Many systems have air return ducts that are too small.
  • Repair damaged and disconnected ducts and straighten out flexible ducts that are tangled or crushed.
  • Seal all leaks and connections with mastic, metal tape, or an aerosol-based sealant.
  • Seal all registers and grills tightly to the ducts.
  • Insulate ducts in unconditioned areas with duct insulation that carries an R-value of 6 or higher.
  • Include a new filter as part of any duct system improvement.
  • Evaluate air flow after repairs are completed.
  • Ensure there is no backdrafting of gas or oil-burning appliances, and conduct a combustion safety test after ducts are sealed.

KNOW YOUR DUCTS

In houses with forced-air heating and … Read Full Post »

Why Choose a Certified Arborist for Tree Services?

Why Hire A Certified Arborist?

The tree service industry is replete with all kinds of characters whose knowledge about trees ranges from laughable to fanatical. At the top tier of the industry stands the Certified Arborist. There are many tree services that have nothing to do with the International Society of Arboriculture and its certifications. Some of them even do a good job. The odds of getting high quality tree care go up when a Certified Arborist is employed. The certification shows a level of dedication to the industry that may be lacking otherwise.In order to test to become a Certified Arborist you need three verifiable years in the tree care industry and a Certified Arborist who is willing to sign off as your sponsor. A few caveats are in order here: There are many Certified Arborists whose knowledge of even the basics are lacking, i.e. they couldn’t even make a … Read Full Post »

Cigarette Beetle

The cigarette beetle is one of the most common household insect pests along the Atlantic Coast and Gulf Coast States. It can be found throughout the year, but seems to be more common in the fall and winter months. The cigarette beetle is native to Egypt. In fact, a beetle was found in King Tutankhamen’s tomb! In the 3,500 years since, it has hardly changed.

The adult beetles are small, squat and oval, about 1/10 inch long, and are covered with small hairs which give them a silky, yellowish-brown color. The antennae are saw-like and the head is retracted. Many times it is mistaken for the Drudstore Beetle, when identified with the naked eye. Adults are strong fliers and prefer subdued light and temperatures over 65 degrees Fahrenheit. The adults tend to fly in late afternoons and on cloudy, overcast days.

As its name implies, the cigarette beetle is a pest of … Read Full Post »