ABC Blog

Rodent Tall “Tails”

Few pests generate as many persistent myths as do pest rodents and their management. Who hasn’t heard stories about “rats as big as cats,” and how some rodenticides supposedly make rodents go outside to drink, or perhaps allegedly mummify them? Here are some great rodent myths:

MYTH: SEWER RATS ARE DIFFERENT FROM WHARF RATS.
FACT: The common commensal rat goes by many nicknames, such as house, wharf, barn, sewer or brown rat. But the correct common name for Rattus norvegicus is the Norway rat. The name supposedly is derived from the fact that the first named specimens were from Norway. Actually, these animals originated in central Asia and spread throughout the world by exploration, commerce and settlement.

The other common commensal pest rat in the United States and many other countries is the roof rat, R. rattus. It’s also called the black, plague or ship rat. This rat is smaller than the Norway … Read Full Post »

Keeping Critters Out of Your Garden & Home

It’s no news that animal waste causes e coli and other diseases. There are plenty of diseases associated with pest animals and their droppings. In addition to diseases, pest animals can cause nightmares for otherwise-happy property owners and gardeners.

Nature’s wild critters can be highly destructive, annoying, and cost you thousands of dollars in repairs. Furthermore, droppings are messy and give a low-class image.

  • Deer forage your foliage
  • Raccoons ravage your garbage
  • Armadillos tear up your lawn
  • Squirrels chew their way into your house, damaging electrical wires
  • Dogs and cats destroy gardens and healthy grass
  • Skunks stink up your whole yard

To prevent pest critter problems, there are several non-lethal, non-chemical, non-barrier solutions. The choices are there for homeowners to consider. Think permanence when you consider the repellent choice, as most homeowners don’t have the time or inclination to monitor the pest situation. Remember that pest animals are on your property for a reason. If they’re happy, comfortable … Read Full Post »

Flea Treatment

Flea Biology

Adult fleas are parasites of warm-blooded animals such as cats, dogs, and humans.  Fleas go through complete metamorphosis, meaning they have an egg, a larva, a pupa, and an adult stage.  Under most situations, fleas will complete their life cycle within three to five weeks.

 

The female flea will lay 4 to 6 eggs after each blood meal and can usually lay several hundred during her lifetime.  The light colored eggs are deposited while on the host, but they fall off the animal and are frequently found in the host’s bedding, carpets, sofas, and crevices in the floor.  The eggs normally hatch between 1 and 10 days, depending on temperature and humidity, while most hatch within 36 hours.

 

Flea larvae are slender, white, legless and between 1/10 and 1/5 inch long.  They are free living and feed on debris found in their environment.  The larval stage usually lasts between 5 and … Read Full Post »

Keeping Rodents Out During Winter Months

Winter weather has pest rodents on the move. Rats and mice may seek food and shelter indoors in your home or place of business, causing damage and spreading disease. Here are some Rodent Action Tips to prevent rodents from setting up a permanent residence and to reduce the risk of disease:

1) SEAL UP

Seal up any openings or cracks large enough to squeeze a pencil through to keep rodents out. Steel wool and caulk are good for blocking small holes. Sheet or lath metal, hardware cloth or concrete can cover larger holes.

2) TRAP OUT

If rodents have already moved in, use ‘green’ methods such as snap traps or glue boards when appropriate. Traps can be baited with peanut butter and placed in areas where rodent droppings are found.

3) CLEAN UP

Minimize places for rodents to live by removing trash and debris from inside and outside the home. Eliminate potential rodent food sources by … Read Full Post »

Rodent Prevention Tip: Clean Up Food!

Clean up rodent food sources and nesting sites

Keep food in thick plastic or metal containers with tight lids.

Eliminate possible rodent food sources:

  • Keep food in thick plastic or metal containers with tight lids.
  • Clean up spilled food right away and wash dishes and cooking utensils soon after use.
  • Keep outside cooking areas and grills clean.
  • Always put pet food away after use and do not leave pet-food or water bowls out overnight.
  • Keep bird feeders away from the house and utilize squirrel guards to limit access to the feeder by squirrels and other rodents.
  • Use a thick plastic or metal garbage can with a tight lid.
  • Keep compost bins as far away from the house as possible (100 feet or more is best).
  • Keep grains and animal feed in thick plastic or metal containers with tight lids. In the evening, uneaten animal feed should be returned to containers with lids.

If storing trash and food waste inside the home, … Read Full Post »

The Basics of Wasp & Bee Control

Wasps and bees are beneficial insects, although they are generally considered to be pests because of their ability to sting. Wasps, in particular, can become a problem in autumn when they may disrupt many outdoor activities. People often mistakenly call all stinging insects “bees”. While both social wasps and bees live in colonies ruled by queens and maintained by workers, they look and behave differently. It is important to distinguish between these insects because different methods may be necessary to control them if they become a nuisance.

APPEARANCE

Wasps have a slender body with a narrow waist, slender, cylindrical legs, and appear smoothed-skinned and shiny. Yellowjackets, baldfaced hornets, and paper wasps are the most common types of wasps encountered by people.

Bees are robust-bodied and very hairy compared with wasps. Their hind legs are flattened for collecting and transporting pollen. Bees are important pollinators. Honey bees are responsible for more than 80% … Read Full Post »

Rodent Prevention Tip: Seal Up Holes!

Mice can squeeze through a hole the size of a nickel, and rats can squeeze through a hole the size of a half dollar! Prevent rodents from entering the home by checking inside and outside the house for gaps or holes.

Where to look for gaps or holes inside your home:

  • Inside, under, and behind kitchen cabinets, refrigerators and stoves.
  • Inside closets near the floor corners.
  • Around the fireplace.
  • Around doors.
  • Around the pipes under sinks and washing machines.
  • Around the pipes going to hot water heaters and furnaces.
  • Around floor vents and dryer vents.
  • Inside the attic.
  • In the basement or crawl space.
  • In the basement and laundry room floor drains.
  • Between the floor and wall juncture.

Where to look for gaps or holes outside your home:

  • In the roof among the rafters, gables, and eaves.
  • Around windows.
  • Around doors.
  • Around the foundation
  • Attic vents and crawl space vents.
  • Under doors.
  • Around holes for electrical, plumbing, cable, and gas lines.

Fill small holes with steel wool. Put caulk around the steel wool to keep … Read Full Post »

Cigarette Beetle

The cigarette beetle is one of the most common household insect pests along the Atlantic Coast and Gulf Coast States. It can be found throughout the year, but seems to be more common in the fall and winter months. The cigarette beetle is native to Egypt. In fact, a beetle was found in King Tutankhamen’s tomb! In the 3,500 years since, it has hardly changed.

The adult beetles are small, squat and oval, about 1/10 inch long, and are covered with small hairs which give them a silky, yellowish-brown color. The antennae are saw-like and the head is retracted. Many times it is mistaken for the Drudstore Beetle, when identified with the naked eye. Adults are strong fliers and prefer subdued light and temperatures over 65 degrees Fahrenheit. The adults tend to fly in late afternoons and on cloudy, overcast days.

As its name implies, the cigarette beetle is a pest of … Read Full Post »

Nuisance Midges

Non-biting midge flies or chironomids commonly occur in inland and coastal natural and man-made bodies of water. These midges are commonly known as “blind mosquitoes” because they are mosquito-like but do not bite. Midges are also called “fuzzy bills” because of the male’s bushy antennae. These aquatic insects are tolerant of a wide range of environmental conditions. Chironomid midges are found in swift moving streams, deep slow moving rivers, stagnant ditches, and in lakes and ponds that are rich in decomposing organic matter. The presence of certain chironomid midges is often used as an indicator of water quality.

Bodies of water in urban and suburban areas are subjected to intensive human use through residential, recreational and agricultural activities. Through runoff, these ponds and lakes often become exceedingly rich in nutrients. Consequently, the variety of organisms in such habitats is usually low with just a few pollution tolerant species developing large populations. … Read Full Post »

Silverfish

Silverfish can become a major pest if left untreated. Silverfish are 1/2″ to 1″ in length, they don’t have wings, they are usually light grey to tan in color and nocturnal. You know they are a problem when you begin to find
them on your ceiling, in light fixtures, in sinks or baths, or on counter tops.    Although silverfish like to eat vegetable matter, they will readily feed on anything in the home. Anything includes meat, pantry items, fabric,
boxes, paper, wallpaper, clothing, pet food or other items in the home.  Most customers we help complain of silverfish which are active in the upstairs of their home such as bathroom and attic areas. And many times this activity is confusing. Silverfish found in bath tubs or sinks are thought to be coming up from the drain pipe. This rarely if ever happens if the sink
is used even just a few times a year.

Here … Read Full Post »